ac·com·mo·da·tion

 (ə-kŏm′ə-dā′shən)n.

1. The act of accommodating or the state of being accommodated; adjustment.

2. Something that meets a need; a convenience.

3. accommodations

a. Room and board; lodgings.

b. A seat, compartment, or room on a public vehicle.

4. Reconciliation or settlement of opposing views.

5. Physiology The automatic adjustment in the focal length of the lens of the eye to permit retinal focus of images of objects at varying distances.

6. A financial favor, such as a loan.

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

accommodation

(əˌkɒməˈdeɪʃən) n

1. lodging or board and lodging

2. adjustment, as of differences or to new circumstances; adaptation, settlement, or reconciliation

3. something fulfilling a need, want, etc; convenience or facility

4. (Physiology) physiol the automatic or voluntary adjustment of the shape of the lens of the eye for far or near vision

5. willingness to help or oblige

6. (Banking & Finance) commerce a loan, usually made as an act of favour by a bank before formal credit arrangements are agreed

Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ac•com•mo•da•tion

(əˌkɒm əˈdeɪ ʃən)

n.

1. the act of accommodating; the state or process of being accommodated; adaptation.

2. adjustment of differences; reconciliation.

3. a process of mutual adaptation between persons or social groups, usu. achieved by eliminating or reducing hostility.

4. anything that supplies a need, want, convenience, etc.

5. Usu., accommodations.

a. lodging.

b. food and lodging.

c. a seat, berth, etc., on a train, plane, or other public vehicle.

6. readiness to aid others; obligingness.

7. a loan.

8. the automatic adjustment by which the eye adapts itself for distinct vision at different distances.

[1595–1605; < Latin]

ac•com`mo•da′tion•al, adj.

Random House Kernerman Webster’s College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

ac·com·mo·da·tion

(ə-kŏm′ə-dā′shən)

The adjustment in the focal length of the lens of the eye. Accommodation permits images at different distances to be focused on the retina.

The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

accommodation

Accommodation is where you live or stay, especially when you are on holiday or when you are staying somewhere for a short amount of time. In British English, accommodation is an uncountable noun. Don’t talk about ‘accommodations’ or ‘an accommodation’.

There is plenty of student accommodation in Edinburgh.

We booked our flights and accommodation three months before our holiday.

Speakers of American English usually talk about accommodations.

The hotel provides cheap accommodations and good food.

Be Careful!
Don’t talk about ‘an accommodation’ in either British English or American English. Don’t say, for example, ‘I’m looking for an accommodation near the city centre’. Say ‘I’m looking for accommodation near the city centre’ or in American English, ‘I’m looking for accommodations near the city centre’.

Collins COBUILD English Usage © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 2004, 2011, 2012

accommodation

The eye’s ability to change the convexity of its lens in order to focus on objects at different distances.

Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited

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